T: @DuaneBrown

The Snippets Extension Header You Pick Affect CPCs and Profitability


Last week I setup a new AdWords account for a two-sided market site focused on aged care for seniors. The client is based in London and has goals to spread across the UK in the long run. While setting up AdWords and going through my process, I got to AdWords extensions and more so the snippet extensions and paused.

snippetYou’ve just over a dozen options to pick as your header, including Black Friday & Cyber Monday, for your snippet extension.

The header helps tell customers what your offerings fall under. Hotels can show amenities; universities can show degrees and travel brands can show neighbourhoods or destinations as options.

For my new clients, I felt they could fall on Types, Amenities and Service Catalog for their header. I was torn between the former two but something told me to try Service Catalog as well. So I picked all three and decided to see what AdWords approved.

After a few days I found out the system approved all three. The account went into review and even after a review by Google’s business team, I was still approved for all three snippet headers. What really caught me off guard was that after running for November and seeing decent traffic to the account…. I started to see a shift in my costs, CPCs and over all my CPA too.

Snippet Performance

This left me with more questions then answers now.

  • Is Service Catalog cheaper because less brands/competitors use that header?
  • With no direct cost for a click on a snippets, how can the ad be cheaper?
    • where all else remains equal.
  • Will this shift in costs maintain as we expand beyond London to across the UK?
  • Does cheap ads mean cheap snippets?

A difference of 12% early in an accounts history does’t seem like a lot of money now, however, 3 years from now when we’re spending hundreds of pounds a month and are across Europe. A savings 12% and a reduction in CPA is going to be helpful. Profitable growth is key.

When Do You Use A Last Non-Direct Click Attribution Model?


As I wrote last month, I’m starting to think about attribution at work. I’m doing this because we’re trying to figure out how to judge the success of a campaign we launch.  I’ve already written about the 5 different multi-channel attribution models and what makes each one different. As I’ve started down this journey though, I’ve came across one more model that’s interesting and promising: Last Non-Direct Click

This takes all your conversions that show up under “Direct” traffic  in Google Analytics (GA) and looks at the second last click before that conversion happened and resigns it to that channel in GA. Many customers will come to your site through a campaign or a landing page and then bounce off your site and or look at other pages on your site. When that happens, those customers will then become a “Direct” channel customer because going from a sub-domain to your main site domain will cause them to get reclassified in Google Analytics.

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The Journey To Multi-Channel Attribution


Attribution has been all the rage at the office the last few weeks. From looking at what would happen if we turned off paid completely, to how we can look at multi-channel attribution but not actually look at multi-channel attribution to judge the success of campaigns we’re working on. To judge the success of a campaign, beyond getting a customer, I’ve started to look at longer attribution windows and look at different goals within our organization.

I’m starting to only hit the tip of the iceberg and though my model is rough and could use a lot of work. It’s a starting point and you’ve to start somewhere…or you’ll never get anywhere.

The last few weeks have reminded me of a good post a few months back looking at 3 top UK retailers and how they have grown up and handled going from last click to multi-channel attribution. A line from the article I like is…

At the end of the day the data has to tell a story and it’s not always the story you want told but one that needs to be told.

How To Build a Custom Report In Google Analytics

Google Analytics Custom Report

Last months we talked about running paid search globally while staying a nimble team. Once you’ve launched a global account, you’re going to want to optimize & lower your CPA while growing your business.

One way I like to optimize a global adwords account is by building custom reports in Google Analytics. Custom reports can present different data sets and show:

  • Which country is driving the most conversions
  • What times of day are converting e.g dayparting opportunities
  • What days of the week are we losing market share
  • Month over month or year over year comparisons
  • Which products are selling / country

These are just some of the options when building a custom report in Google Analytics. Anytime I’ve said I wish I could see X or slice data by a third or fourth dimension in Google Analytics, custom reports has saved the day. This is especially true if you’re not a fan of pivot tables or don’t want to download thousands of rows of data.

We’re going to take a look at the first option on my list above; which country is driving the most conversions. It’s a basic report but a key one since we can’t easily get that data in AdWords. I deliberately chose not to add each country, outside our top markets, in our global adwords account as I wanted to save time and I wasn’t sure what countries would perform well. Below is what the standard custom report would look like.

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How To Run Paid Search Globally With A Nimble Team


Normally I tell clients, bosses and people I talk with at conferences that I spend 80% of my time focused on 80% of my paid search business because that’s where I can have the biggest impact. I can see the largest return for my efforts in terms of new customers coming in and increasing profitable revenue.

It’s a common knowledge that I always advise clients to look at the top 10 countries that produce 80% of their revenue and make sure each country has their own AdWords account. Your company could have 15 countries that make up 80% of your revenue but I’d not go beyond that amount as it becomes a lot of work for one person to manage.

I actually even gave a talk about unlocking unmet demand in your AdWords account a few months ago at a conference. The reason you want to give each top tier country their own AdWords account is fourfolds:

  • Organization of information is cleaner across your accounts by country
  • Learning what keywords & ad text is working for each country. One size doesn’t fit all
  • Spotting trends in data is a lot easier by country in AdWords & Google Analytics (GA)
  • Growth isn’t an issue as you’ve room to grow each country like its own mini-business

A bonus is when you hire a person or two to join your team, you can give each person a set of countries to manage  and not worry about having to break out each county at that point. If you did, you’d lose all that account history (and quality score potentially) you’ve build up because you didn’t plan for the future.

Now what I’m about to say goes against everything I just said above because you’re not dealing with 80% of your business, you’re dealing with the other 20%. Unless money is unlimited where you work. You need to consolidate resources and make a Global Adwords Account targeting non-top 10 countries.

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