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13 Tools To Help Market Your Startup In 2015

Startup Marketing Bullhorn

Working in the performance marketing space for 8 of the last 10 years has been amazing. I’ve been able to use many tools and services to do my job better (and faster). Maintaining quality should always been number 1.

I also believe in automation not repetition where possible. You should know how to do the task manually before automating anything (and why you’re doing it).

Below are some of the tools I use each week (some daily) to get my job done. A couple I’ve been using for 8 years now. They have stood the test of time.

Automation
Zapier – The software helps you connect two programs together that don’t have an official integration. e.g. importing a Twitter list into a Slack channel, so it’s searchable later by your team. I did this recently for a Twitter list I had based on research publications. Zapier’s recipe library.

IFTTT – It’s is a web-based service that allows users to create chains of simple conditional statements, called “recipes”, which are triggered based on changes to other web services such as Gmail, Dropbox, Instagram, and Craigslist. Seer Interactive put together a great list of IFTTT recipes for marketers.

AdWords Scripts – Provide a way to programmatically control your AdWords data. You can use scripts to automate common procedures or interact with external data in one to many AdWords accounts. Brainlabs has an AdWords script library that is a great resource if you work in the commerce space or have a ton of different inventory and SKUs.

Search Trends
Knowing what a community or country is searching for is high up there for performance marketers. Each country and industry offer a rich nuance of what makes them unique. Having lived in 5 cities on 3 continents, I can tell you for a fact that the subtle differences are what make this job challenging and interesting.

I use both Google’s Keyword Planner and KeywordTool.io to find out what people search for and what’s trending over the last 12 months. Don’t forget Google’s Trends for a global POV on search and knowledge.

Analytics
Google’s URL Builder helps you track campaigns beyond what gets important in Google Analytics. I use it for campaigns on third-party networks, Bing and anything I’d want to track in MixPanel.

Medium’s Charted helps you take your data and visualize it. Not everyone is a fan of or knows how to do pivot tables. Charted helps with that by visualizing any data set you link into, however, it doesn’t store any data on the site. The tool has only been out 4 months but it’s already proving to be very useful. If you work with a decentralized team, this tool along with Slack is a one two punch combo.

Social Advertising
Facebook’s Grid Tool checks if your newsfeed ad is 20% over the text limit. Platform limitation on social advertising is a challenge to keep track of. Both these links will help you understand if something is possible at a basic level. It’s not guaranteed but it’s a good starting point.

Photos
If you’re building landing pages, as you do in marketing, than Compfight (searches Flickr) and a post called Stock photos that don’t suck should be your first port of call. You don’t want to have bad stock photos on your site when you’re trying to do a launch in 48 hours.

Chrome Extensions
The folks at Zapier made a great post last year on 10 Setup Tips and 20+ Extensions for the savvy marketer that uses Google Chrome. Check it out. It’s how I stumbled on them almost a year ago.

Bonus Tool – Startup Stash is a new curated directory featuring resources & tools that startups would find helpful.

What are your favourite tools or services to help market a startup?

A Practical Guide To Mobile App Marketing

A few weeks ago I wrote about the basics of app store optimization. We’ve already proved that mobile is here. With more than 2 billion smartphones worldwide and that number expected to double by 2020.There has never been a better time to get involved with marketing an app. Plus with Google putting ads in the app store to court mobile app marketers and saying that mobile signals will affect search ranking. We’re truly living in a mobile world.

Mobile Commerces
8QrzMWe may not be seeing tons of transactions occurring on mobile devices but we’re seeing people research, especially in store, and browse a brand’s digital properties while on their device.

Once brands build better mobile experience on smartphones (site & commerce stores), we’ll see that shift in mobile transactions increase sharply in the next 2-3 years. There is pent up demand that needs to be satisfied.

Even with tablets expected to surpass 1 billion users this year. The fact many people use them at home, shows that a tablet is more of a PC than a mobile smartphone in its current incarnation.

Today we’re going to look at marketing your app. A lot of brands need to do this to stay competitive or help raise their brand’s awareness in a crowded marketplace. As Ev said, attention is short and its what we should be paying for.

Now how to spend your money wisely, so you get the best return. Using my experience of marketing an app for a UK startup last year. I’ll cover the four areas you need to consider before marketing your app: Research, Analytics, Spend and Media Networks.

Read more…

Free Tool Builds 100+ Long-Tail Keywords For SEO & PPC

Keyword Tool uses Google’s Autocomplete to generate 750 relevant long-tail keywords based around a set of words you type into the search box (it’s free). If you’re involved with SEO, PPC or content creation then you know how useful these keywords can be. You can also find out searches for Google Play, which I’ll get into next month when I write about the Basics of App Store Optimization (ASO).

About Google’s Autocomplete
As you type in Google’s search box, you can find information quickly by seeing search predictions that might be similar to the search terms you’re typing. For example, as you start to type [Canadian], you may see other popular Canadian-related searches.

are-canadians-google-search

Read more…

Difference between User Acquisition & Demand Generation

signs-of-b2b-lead-generation-success

Performance marketing (paid search, display and paid social) is a challenging and interesting space with heavy industry jargon. Similar to customer vs consumer, the latter being a person who buys a product in your category/vertical but doesn’t buy from your company, like a customer would.

I see many people mix up and use the terms user acquisition & demand generation interchangeably. I don’t feel they mean the same thing.

So what is the key difference between the two terms?

Demand Generation: Sits at the top of the purchase funnel covering awareness and consideration
Similar to consumers, these people don’t buy from you (not yet anyways). Consumers might buy from you competitor(s) or you might have to show these people why they need your product. This is especially true if you’re creating a whole new category for your industry. This is what the iPod, tablets, Dropbox and even the selfie stick have all done. There was no (or very little) demand for this product before and in a few short years (9 for the selfie stick) you’ve people who can’t live without these product.

User Acquisition: Sits at the bottom of the purchase funnel covering purchase(s) and advocacy
Like customers, these people already use your product or service.User acquisition falls under purchase and advocacy for the purchase funnel.  Customers could be new or long-term users of your product, but they buy from you none the less. Your job is to up/cross sell other products from your company and create a long-term customer for your brand. The work isn’t done once someone has bought from you, you’ve to work twice as hard to keep them as a customer.

What do you think… am I off base about user acquisition & demand generation?

Why Focusing On Major Cities May Cost Your Business Money

Why Does It Matters
Depending on your business, you may get 80% of your business from urban centres. However, you may not spend that same amount on your marketing in your those markets (could spend more or less). Finding out where you get your business from and what you spend to acquire that customer is a key determination of your success.

A similar example of this idea is a story I heard a few years ago about major bank who found out that 10% of their customers where producing 70% of the calls to their call centre (and thus were greatly unprofitable for them). After months of doing the research and double checking their number, they sent those customers a letter saying they couldn’t be a customer anymore and would happily help them transfer to a new bank. This allowed the bank to refocus on up selling and creating better services to their profitable customers.

Business is as much about making your company more money as it is about finding ways to cut down on your expenses and focus on your profitable areas of the business.

How To Do It
If you login your Google Analytics and head to the “Channel” subsection under “Acquisition” on the left hand panel. You’ll see all the different marketing channels that are driving your business forward.

Read more…

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