T: @DuaneBrown

The Journey To Multi-Channel Attribution

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Attribution has been all the rage at the office the last few weeks. From looking at what would happen if we turned off paid completely, to how we can look at multi-channel attribution but not actually look at multi-channel attribution to judge the success of campaigns we’re working on. To judge the success of a campaign, beyond getting a customer, I’ve started to look at longer attribution windows and look at different goals within our organization.

I’m starting to only hit the tip of the iceberg and though my model is rough and could use a lot of work. It’s a starting point and you’ve to start somewhere…or you’ll never get anywhere.

The last few weeks have reminded me of a good post a few months back looking at 3 top UK retailers and how they have grown up and handled going from last click to multi-channel attribution. A line from the article I like is…

At the end of the day the data has to tell a story and it’s not always the story you want told but one that needs to be told.

How To Build a Custom Report In Google Analytics

Google Analytics Custom Report

Last months we talked about running paid search globally while staying a nimble team. Once you’ve launched a global account, you’re going to want to optimize & lower your CPA while growing your business.

One way I like to optimize a global adwords account is by building custom reports in Google Analytics. Custom reports can present different data sets and show:

  • Which country is driving the most conversions
  • What times of day are converting e.g dayparting opportunities
  • What days of the week are we losing market share
  • Month over month or year over year comparisons
  • Which products are selling / country

These are just some of the options when building a custom report in Google Analytics. Anytime I’ve said I wish I could see X or slice data by a third or fourth dimension in Google Analytics, custom reports has saved the day. This is especially true if you’re not a fan of pivot tables or don’t want to download thousands of rows of data.

We’re going to take a look at the first option on my list above; which country is driving the most conversions. It’s a basic report but a key one since we can’t easily get that data in AdWords. I deliberately chose not to add each country, outside our top markets, in our global adwords account as I wanted to save time and I wasn’t sure what countries would perform well. Below is what the standard custom report would look like.

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How To: A Beginners Guide to Adwords Scripts

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I’ve to admit I’m not a coder and I don’t plan to become one. I know HTML but that’s pretty basic and doesn’t qualify as coding skills as much as it did a decade ago when I was in college. However, after a year of many failed attempts and re-reading all I could on AdWords scripts, I finally got three to run successfully yesterday.

AdWords scripts are little pieces of software that you add to your AdWords account (or My Client Centre MCC) and help automatic tedious tasks for you that you want to take off your plate and free up your time. Most run behind the scenes and you’d never know they are there. Think of them as little Christmas helper elves. You should watch the video on the AdWords scripts homepage to get started.  You can check out the solution gallery but I wanted to focus on the two scripts that I feel any AdWords advertisers can run: Link Checker and Keywords Performance Report.

 

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Multi-Channel Attribution That Goes Beyond Last Click

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A few weeks ago I attended a conference in Portland, Oregon and had an amazing time (in Portland not the conference). Great food scene and tons of stores to do some shopping in.

However, a few of the topic sessions at the conference talked about attribution and moving us beyond last click (or even first click). Everyone seems to be very set on using position based attribution for their model of figuring out how to assign sales and conversions to different channels in their customer journey.

A quick primer on different attribution models. There are several types of attribution models:

  • Last interaction attribution model – This model assign 100% credit to the last interactions. Google Analytics uses this model by default. Also known as last click.
  • First interaction attribution model (popularly known as first touch attribution model) – This model assign 100% credit to the first interactions. This is what Google AdWords and Bing use.
  • Linear attribution model – This model assign equal credit to each interaction in a conversion path.
  • Time Decay attribution model – This model assign more credit to the last interactions before someone became a customer.
  • Position based attribution model – This model assign 40% credit to the first interaction, 20% credit to the middle interaction and 40% credit to the last interaction.

Using position based attribution while saying all first & last clicks  are the same value is odd. What if one channel is bringing in higher value customers with a higher lifetime value (LTV) than another channel. Isn’t that channel worth more to the business?

And if that channel is worth more, that starts to make any model you build utterly more complicated. Not to make anything more complex but Google also now has data driven attribution, which I thought was new but it seems to be something that Google Analytics premium customers have had for a few years now.

I don’t have all the answers but I know paid search drives a lot of top of the funnel conversions for clients I’ve had over the years even if that person converted from another channel on the lsat click. How much of that sale should paid search get is the question I still ask myself.

A Practical Guide To Mobile App Marketing

A few weeks ago I wrote about the basics of app store optimization. We’ve already proved that mobile is here. With more than 2 billion smartphones worldwide and that number expected to double by 2020.There has never been a better time to get involved with marketing an app. Plus with Google putting ads in the app store to court mobile app marketers and saying that mobile signals will affect search ranking. We’re truly living in a mobile world.

Mobile Commerces
8QrzMWe may not be seeing tons of transactions occurring on mobile devices but we’re seeing people research, especially in store, and browse a brand’s digital properties while on their device.

Once brands build better mobile experience on smartphones (site & commerce stores), we’ll see that shift in mobile transactions increase sharply in the next 2-3 years. There is pent up demand that needs to be satisfied.

Even with tablets expected to surpass 1 billion users this year. The fact many people use them at home, shows that a tablet is more of a PC than a mobile smartphone in its current incarnation.

Today we’re going to look at marketing your app. A lot of brands need to do this to stay competitive or help raise their brand’s awareness in a crowded marketplace. As Ev said, attention is short and its what we should be paying for.

Now how to spend your money wisely, so you get the best return. Using my experience of marketing an app for a UK startup last year. I’ll cover the four areas you need to consider before marketing your app: Research, Analytics, Spend and Media Networks.

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